Research ranges broadly across major scientific issues in the tropics, with research projects on tropical botany, ecosystems, behavior, genomics, and faunal assemblages. Because of Miami's unique location, we have several local resources available to faculty and students. On campus, we host the Gifford Arboretum, which students and faculty use for research, teaching and outreach. We also have close ties with the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, and the Abess Center for Ecosystem Science & Policy, where some of our graduate students receive support and a few of our faculty have adjunct appointments.

Tropical Biology


William E Browne

Asst. Professor

w.browne@miami.edu

(305) 284-3319
Research in my lab is focused on investigating patterns of change underlying animal diversity.  We employ a wide range of experimental approaches to explore the molecular genetic relationship between genotype and phenotype from both developmental and evolutionary perspectives. Current work in the lab primarily use cultures of the lobate...

Michael Stephen Gaines

Professor
Assistant Provost of Undergraduate Research and Community Outreach

m.gaines@miami.edu

(305) 284-5058
Michael Gaines is assistant provost of undergraduate research and community outreach. Dr. Gaines is director of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Undergraduate Education Program. The major goal of the program is to increase the number of disadvantaged students in biomedical research careers. He also directs an NIH Bridge Program between the...

Kevin Grant McCracken

Assoc. Professor

k.mccracken@miami.edu

(305) 284-9058
KUSHLAN CHAIR IN WATERBIRD BIOLOGY & CONSERVATION AREAS OF FOCUS Evolutionary Biology Tropical Ecology

Carol Horvitz Nutt

Professor

carolhorvitz@miami.edu

(305) 284-5364
Horvitz's background is in plant populations dynamics, particularly stochastic demography where environmental dynamics are modeled by Markov chains. Currently she is on the governing board of the Evolutionary Demography Society and the Nominating Committee of the Organization for Tropical Studies. In the past, she served as the Treasurer of...

Kathleen Sullivan Sealey

Assoc. Professor

ksealey@miami.edu

(305) 284-3013

William A Searcy

Professor

wsearcy@miami.edu

(305) 284-2065
My principal research interest is in animal communication. I have for many years investigated functional aspects of bird song in collaboration with Steve Nowicki and Susan Peters of Duke University. One focus of this work has been on exploring the implications of proximate mechanisms of song development and song neurobiology for ultimate...

Leonel O Sternberg

Professor

l.sternberg@miami.edu

(305) 284-6436
I am interested in how natural processes occurring at the organismal level scale up to communities and ecosystems. I use the natural abundances of carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes as a scaling tool. These isotopes are used as natural tracers of biochemical, physiological and ecosystem processes. Knowing something about...

Kathryn W Tosney

Professor

ktosney@miami.edu

(305) 284-2673
In my lab, research projects range widely, but are centered in the field of Developmental Biology. We often use the neuron as a tool to understand the embryo and its cellular and developmental mechanisms. Some of our projects use classical techniques such as embryonic surgery to discover basic phenomena, such how cell death controls development...

John Albert C Uy

Assoc. Professor

j.uy@miami.edu

(305) 284-8558
The tropics harbor the greatest diversity on the planet. However, we still know little about the mechanisms that create and maintain this striking diversity. Using an interdisciplinary approach, research in the Uy lab aims to elucidate how biological diversity is generated and maintained in tropical and island systems. Our current focus is to...

Barbara Whitlock

Assoc. Professor

b.whitlock@miami.edu

(305) 284-3512
The primary goal of my research is to understand the origins of plant diversity. I use phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data in combination with information from morphology, anatomy, ecology, and genetics to understand the timing and direction of changes in floral and vegetative traits, geographic distribution, and diversification rates....

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